September 18, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

Disbelief. Shame. Awkwardness. Discomfort. Each one of these feelings can cycle through a family caregiver’s mind when a senior with dementia showcases disinhibited behaviors, such as:

  • Rude or tactless comments
  • Inappropriate sexual remarks or advances
  • Removal of clothes at improper times
  • Other socially unacceptable actions

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 September 14, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

While circus clowns and comedians may stir audiences to laughter over such stunts as slipping on a banana peel, there is nothing funny about falling when it comes to the elderly, who are at an elevated risk for serious injuries which could bring about a lengthy rehabilitation process. Not only that, but there’s a lesser known complication that typically arises from a senior’s fall: a fear of falling again which can be extreme enough to impact quality of life and health. (more…)


 July 6, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

In an ideal world, we might perfectly compartmentalize our caregiving duties, sticking to a routine that met the requirements of a senior loved one, while enabling the time necessary to manage our assortment of other responsibilities. But naturally, life does not always follow our desired script, and conflicting needs are not unusual when caring for an older adult. Many older adults balk at the need for help, while others may come to depend too heavily on an adult child, leading to unfulfilled expectations and ultimately irritation for both parties. (more…)


 June 25, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

Searching through bins, cabinets, and closets, pulling out assorted items from drawers, and searching repetitively through a number of items might be frustrating for individuals providing care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s, but in reality these behaviors are fulfilling a purpose. Rummaging can supply a measure of comfort for those with Alzheimer’s, through identifying familiar items and finding purpose and meaning. (more…)


 June 16, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

Stress is inevitable, and actually, not always a negative thing. After all, as the saying goes, “A diamond is just a piece of charcoal that handled stress exceptionally well.” Nonetheless, especially if you are providing care for a senior family member, the amount of stress can quickly intensify and be overwhelming, and when not handled well, lead to serious health issues. (more…)


 June 11, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

A time of crisis can bring out both the very best together with the worst in us. Throughout the coronavirus pandemic, we’ve heard stories of people hoarding items and selling them in order to make an excessive profit, coupled with stories of heroes who selflessly met the needs of others despite their personal fears. (more…)


 May 13, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

An older adult who exhibits loss of memory, confusion, poor judgment, repetition, and problems with completing day to day activities has the distinguishing signs of Alzheimer’s disease, right? Actually, what seems like an obvious case of Alzheimer’s may in fact be a newly recognized dementia.

Known as LATE, or limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy, this diagnosis presents with almost identical symptoms, but the root cause is another story. As opposed to the buildup of amyloid plaques and tangles inherent with Alzheimer’s, LATE is diagnosed by deposits of TDP-43 protein, according to Dr. Julie Schneider, associate director for the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center.

And TDP-43 protein issues are in fact quite common in seniors, with as many as one in four older adults over age 85 impacted enough to cause recognizable cognitive and/or memory issues. Yet it continues to be an under-diagnosed condition, which might result in mis-diagnoses, and consequently, inappropriate treatment plans.

The latest guidelines call for seniors who have been diagnosed with LATE to be pulled from Alzheimer’s medication research, focusing research alternatively on establishing biomarkers to better detect LATE, to locate therapeutic intervention methods, and to expand testing to include a broader array of diverse populations, in an effort to perfect both prevention and treatment.

Being familiar with the differences between both types of dementia is paramount to appropriate treatment, and according to Dr. James Pickett, head of research at the Alzheimer’s Society, “This evidence may also go some way to help us understand why some recent clinical trials testing for Alzheimer’s disease have failed – participants may have had slightly different brain diseases.”

Key components of LATE include:

  • Generally affecting older adults over age 80
  • A much slower advancement than Alzheimer’s
  • Usually only affects memory
  • Could be combined with Alzheimer’s disease, which leads to an even more rapid decline

Whether Alzheimer’s disease, LATE, or some other form of dementia, At Home Independent Living provides the fully customized, skilled and creative caregiving that helps senior loved ones live the highest possible quality of life where it’s most comfortable: at home. Our care aides are fully trained and experienced in assisting those with dementia, as well as family caregivers, to more effectively manage the varying challenges experienced in each stage.

Contact us any time at (315) 579-HOME (4663) to ask about further dementia care resources, find answers to your questions, or to schedule a consultation to discover more about how we can assist with home or respite care in Syracuse, NY and the surrounding areas.


 March 12, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

If you’re feeling a bit overwhelmed in your role as caregiver, take heart; you’re in good company. Providing companion care services at home for aging parents is probably one of the most complex roles we can hold: highly gratifying on the one hand, while simultaneously frustrating and ever-evolving, frequently leading to feelings of doubt about whether we are up to the challenge and providing the most beneficial care. (more…)


 September 16, 2019 by Dean Bellefeuille

Researchers are finally starting to get a grip on the imbalance between Alzheimer’s diagnoses in females and males. Presently, as many as 2/3 of those with Alzheimer’s in the U.S. are female, and as scientists continue to better grasp the particular nuances driving this trend, we are able to start addressing them. (more…)


 June 19, 2019 by Dean Bellefeuille

Psychologist in the research project who subsequently launched a program to combat the downward spiral of emotions so prevalent in those providing care for a senior loved one, says, “We’re not saying don’t be sad or upset about what’s going on. But we know people can experience positive emotions alongside that negative emotion, and that positive emotion can help them cope better.” (more…)