October 14, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or another type of dementia requires creativity, patience, and empathy, being able to step away from your individual logic and reasoning and realize why a specific behavior is occurring, and then to know just how to effectively deal with dementia behaviors. That is certainly the case with an older adult who will not change his or her clothing, no matter how dirty or unkempt an outfit has become. (more…)


 September 18, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

Disbelief. Shame. Awkwardness. Discomfort. Each one of these feelings can cycle through a family caregiver’s mind when a senior with dementia showcases disinhibited behaviors, such as:

  • Rude or tactless comments
  • Inappropriate sexual remarks or advances
  • Removal of clothes at improper times
  • Other socially unacceptable actions

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 August 27, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

Researchers at the UC San Diego School of Medicine who thought they were examining connective tissue cell protein got quite a shock when they instead stumbled upon a treatment to eradicate the observable symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in mice. Not only that, but the treatment could potentially be useful in many different conditions that call for the need to replace damaged tissue: diabetes, spinal cord injuries, even coronary disease. (more…)


 August 20, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

It can come seemingly out of the blue: you put your loved one’s favorite tuna sandwich on the table – light on the mayo, no onions – something which usually brings her happiness. But this time, she pushes the plate away and refuses to take a bite, insisting that you’ve poisoned the meal. (more…)


 June 25, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

Searching through bins, cabinets, and closets, pulling out assorted items from drawers, and searching repetitively through a number of items might be frustrating for individuals providing care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s, but in reality these behaviors are fulfilling a purpose. Rummaging can supply a measure of comfort for those with Alzheimer’s, through identifying familiar items and finding purpose and meaning. (more…)


 May 13, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

An older adult who exhibits loss of memory, confusion, poor judgment, repetition, and problems with completing day to day activities has the distinguishing signs of Alzheimer’s disease, right? Actually, what seems like an obvious case of Alzheimer’s may in fact be a newly recognized dementia.

Known as LATE, or limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy, this diagnosis presents with almost identical symptoms, but the root cause is another story. As opposed to the buildup of amyloid plaques and tangles inherent with Alzheimer’s, LATE is diagnosed by deposits of TDP-43 protein, according to Dr. Julie Schneider, associate director for the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center.

And TDP-43 protein issues are in fact quite common in seniors, with as many as one in four older adults over age 85 impacted enough to cause recognizable cognitive and/or memory issues. Yet it continues to be an under-diagnosed condition, which might result in mis-diagnoses, and consequently, inappropriate treatment plans.

The latest guidelines call for seniors who have been diagnosed with LATE to be pulled from Alzheimer’s medication research, focusing research alternatively on establishing biomarkers to better detect LATE, to locate therapeutic intervention methods, and to expand testing to include a broader array of diverse populations, in an effort to perfect both prevention and treatment.

Being familiar with the differences between both types of dementia is paramount to appropriate treatment, and according to Dr. James Pickett, head of research at the Alzheimer’s Society, “This evidence may also go some way to help us understand why some recent clinical trials testing for Alzheimer’s disease have failed – participants may have had slightly different brain diseases.”

Key components of LATE include:

  • Generally affecting older adults over age 80
  • A much slower advancement than Alzheimer’s
  • Usually only affects memory
  • Could be combined with Alzheimer’s disease, which leads to an even more rapid decline

Whether Alzheimer’s disease, LATE, or some other form of dementia, At Home Independent Living provides the fully customized, skilled and creative caregiving that helps senior loved ones live the highest possible quality of life where it’s most comfortable: at home. Our care aides are fully trained and experienced in assisting those with dementia, as well as family caregivers, to more effectively manage the varying challenges experienced in each stage.

Contact us any time at (315) 579-HOME (4663) to ask about further dementia care resources, find answers to your questions, or to schedule a consultation to discover more about how we can assist with home or dementia care in Syracuse, NY and the surrounding areas.


 April 14, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

Providing dementia care is a fluid, ever-evolving process. One day can be calm and peaceful, with your loved one enjoying activities, eating healthy meals, and sharing laughter with you; while the next day may be fraught with agitation, anxiety, and sullenness. What will today bring? 

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 March 19, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

Dementia care involves both compassion and creativity to deal with a number of complicated behaviors and effects, and that is particularly true when dealing with incontinence in dementia patients, something that is exceedingly frequent with the disease. These tried-and-true approaches can be effective in decreasing the impact of incontinence and reducing an escalation of emotions in someone you love with Alzheimer’s. (more…)


 February 19, 2020 by Dean Bellefeuille

Agitation is among the more difficult symptoms of Alzheimer’s, and it may be incredibly hard for family members to control. One of the keys is in taking steps to deal with agitation before it is felt and conveyed by the senior loved one, which involves keeping track of what has caused these feelings in the past, and creating a home environment in which those stimulants are removed or minimized. These strategies can help: (more…)